Tag Archives: war films

Review: Private Peaceful (film)

Private Peaceful.

This film adaptation of Michael Morpurgo’s novel by the same name may be better critiqued by someone who has read the book and can compare the two. I have not, but having looked up the book and found it to have been classified as being appropriate for ages 8 to 12 (what used to be lumped into the broad classification of “Juvenile Fiction,” but these days could perhaps be shoehorned into “Middle Grade”), I can only surmise that certain liberties may have been taken with the plot to make the story more appealing to an adult audience that expects “adult themes” in its entertainment.

It stretches credulity that a career gamekeeper and forester would have neglected to teach his children never to approach during a shoot, because of the risk of their being mistakenly shot, and the possibility of their scaring away the game; nor to approach him when he was at work felling trees, or failing that, where not to stand when a tree was being felled: a forester of my acquaintance always knew exactly where any tree he chopped down would fall.

The battle scenes leave a little to be desired: the pyrotechnics are not as powerful as in other war films, and the cinematography not as skillful. There is a fine moment of irony in the accusation of “cowardice in the face of the enemy,” when “the enemy” becomes identified with someone not normally described by that term.

The continual jumping back and forth between flashback time periods gets a little wearing on the patience. The accents are sometimes difficult for this North American to decipher. At the end of the movie, a sudden caginess in the dialogue makes the viewer suspect that a plot twist is about to be perpetrated that makes the opening scene in the prison begin to look like a red herring: after the film was over, I replayed the last two segments to make sure that what I thought I’d missed hearing really wasn’t there.

The film does function as an interesting perspective on the primitive nature of the physical and social conditions of life only a hundred years ago, and the hazards appertaining thereto.

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Review: The Red Baron (film)

The Red Baron.

Yesterday was the 100th anniversary of the death of Manfred von Richthofen, so I re-visited this film, preparatory to writing this post. It was as disappointing the second time around as it was the first.

The movie just flirts with history, which is understandable: von Richthofen was only 25 years old when he died, so he wasn’t around long enough to do much more than to become famous as Germany’s flying ace with the most kills during the First World War. He is credited with having written a brief memoir (Der rote Kampfflieger), but considering how young he was, what his connections were, and his celebrity status in Germany, it was probably ghost-written for him.

But from the first scene on, the script of this movie is almost laughably fictitious. To begin with, boys of his time, especially those with von Richthofen’s background (Prussian petite noblesse), never would have behaved as he was portrayed at the beginning of the film. No boy who was old enough to be out hunting with a gun would have been so stupid as to have taken to the woods with a noisily panting pet dog, instead of a trained hunting dog. Furthermore, boys were raised with a healthy respect for firearms and their value, so Manfred never would have abandoned a gun in the forest, just to go rubbernecking at an airplane from the back of a horse.

For much of the rest of the movie, what time is not spent tossing a little history around in dialogue between talking heads is devoted to shoehorning a patently fictional love interest into the story, and displaying vertiginously filmed dogfights that feature hokey closeups showing the pilots doing ridiculous things, such as looking over their shoulders directly into the sun, to locate enemy aircraft.

The film closes with no effort made to postulate who really shot down the Red Baron, although it seems to give the nod to Roy Brown, whose claim to have done so has been discredited, based on the evidence of von Richthofen’s sole wound: through the thorax at an angle impossible for Brown to have shot him, even if Brown had still been pursuing him at the time.

If the makers of the movie had put as much time into writing a better script as they must have done to find an actor who so strongly resembles von Richthofen, the story might have been of more substance than just light entertainment with a historical figure attached.

 

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Wrapping Up The Great War.

As we draw to the close of the Great War centenary, we also approach reviews of the remaining materials in my First World War library (in no particular order):

 

As a monthly lineup, this selection of videos takes us through October, although I expect to add a few other items, and there will be a special Armistice Day edition of our Trench Newspaper.

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