Review: Silent Night (Weintraub)

weintraub

Silent Night: The Story of the World War I Christmas Truce

A short, somewhat repetitive, but fairly well documented and very well illustrated account of the unofficial “truce” that has haunted the memory of the The Great War for the century since it occurred. My copy says nothing about a “new epilogue,” but the last chapter, “What If–?” serves that purpose adequately.

The truce was repeated in subsequent years, albeit not as flagrantly as the first time. One of those “undercover” truces takes place in The Passions of Patriots.

As always, the faces in the photos are captivating. One can’t help wondering why so many men who knew the truth about one another’s essential similarity could not have combined against the few whose ambitions had precipitated the war, and ended it, as the pundits had predicted, “by Christmas.”

But despite the modernity of the war and how we may identify with the men who participated in it, the combatants did belong to a different era, one that regarded civilization in a different light to how their descendants have come to define it since then. And yet, pockets of those century-old prejudices still persist, making the first Christmas truce of the First World War the first of many lessons still not learned from that conflict.

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3 Comments

Filed under Book Reviews, Great War, Uncategorized

3 responses to “Review: Silent Night (Weintraub)

  1. That sounds interesting. I grew up in the home of a WW2 vet, so I knew a lot about that war, but not so much about the one that came first. To be honest, I never even heard of the Christmas truce.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Some people say that the two wars were really just one war that had a long cease-fire in the middle of it. Others point to poor decisions made during WWI as the reason why there’s still trouble in the Middle East and south-west Asia. But I don’t think the Muses are going to make me write about that, until I return to working on the Irish Firebrands sequel, which will be Medb’s story, plus tie up some loose ends from IF and POP.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I think I’ve shared with you before that my sister is a history major with her concentration in military history… I asked her about this since I read it, and she told me about it. 🙂 I bet she’d love your vast collection of resource books as well as POP when it is ready. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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